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It’s all about the bond by Lyn Hemphill

I can’t imagine a writer who doesn’t also love to lose themselves in a story. I imagine all of us live, like me, in multiple parallel universes at once, bearing witness to great love stories and pirates and space explorers, either ones we’re writing, or ones others have written.

I’ve spent a lot of my life writing the things I want to read, and that’s still what drives me now. I’ve never really had a favourite genre, though. It’s all about the relationships. I don’t really care if it’s fantasy or contemporary fiction, lit-fic or YA, as long as there is a bond between people that burrows its way into my heart and makes me feel all the things.

My favourite author at the moment is Alice Oseman, who writes beautiful stories about complex people and their friendships and love affairs. Mostly friendships, though, and I think that’s what I love the most. Although I love a good romance, I don’t want to feel like the platonic bonds are any more or less important to a person’s life. In Radio Silence, for example, the main character, Francis, has no real romantic relationship herself; it’s all about her friendship with Aled and fighting for him when his family lets him down.

Also Francis’ mum is my role model, so there’s that.

As I write this, I realise it’s been painfully long since I last read a fiction book. So many things have got in the way recently – work, lockdown, and not wanting to bury myself so deeply into a story that I have to be hauled back kicking and screaming.

(Have you ever seen the meme of Marvel’s Loki glaring at the camera, that says ‘go ahead, interrupt my reading one more time…’? That’s me. My kids don’t deserve that much sass.)

I have read non-fiction, though, as for some reason when I’m really stressed and busy what helps me to relax is to read about quantum biology in Life on the Edge (amazing!) or the anthropological basis for religion, politics and currencies in Sapiens (also amazing).

I’ve got a bookshelf full of new books that I can’t wait to read. The Rest of Us Just Live Here by Patrick Ness, for example, Cemetery Boys by Aiden Thomas, even Bronte’s Jane Eyre because somehow I’ve still never read the whole thing.

I can’t imagine a writer who doesn’t also love to lose themselves in a story. I imagine all of us live, like me, in multiple parallel universes at once, bearing witness to great love stories and pirates and space explorers, either ones we’re writing, or ones others have written.

I’ve spent a lot of my life writing the things I want to read, and that’s still what drives me now. I’ve never really had a favourite genre, though. It’s all about the relationships. I don’t really care if it’s fantasy or contemporary fiction, lit-fic or YA, as long as there is a bond between people that burrows its way into my heart and makes me feel all the things.

My favourite author at the moment is Alice Oseman, who writes beautiful stories about complex people and their friendships and love affairs. Mostly friendships, though, and I think that’s what I love the most. Although I love a good romance, I don’t want to feel like the platonic bonds are any more or less important to a person’s life. In Radio Silence, for example, the main character, Francis, has no real romantic relationship herself; it’s all about her friendship with Aled and fighting for him when his family lets him down.

Also Francis’ mum is my role model, so there’s that.

As I write this, I realise it’s been painfully long since I last read a fiction book. So many things have got in the way recently – work, lockdown, and not wanting to bury myself so deeply into a story that I have to be hauled back kicking and screaming.

(Have you ever seen the meme of Marvel’s Loki glaring at the camera, that says ‘go ahead, interrupt my reading one more time…’? That’s me. My kids don’t deserve that much sass.)

I have read non-fiction, though, as for some reason when I’m really stressed and busy what helps me to relax is to read about quantum biology in Life on the Edge (amazing!) or the anthropological basis for religion, politics and currencies in Sapiens (also amazing).

I’ve got a bookshelf full of new books that I can’t wait to read. The Rest of Us Just Live Here by Patrick Ness, for example, Cemetery Boys by Aiden Thomas, even Bronte’s Jane Eyre because somehow I’ve still never read the whole thing.

But when I come through the other side of this very busy period, I can guarantee these won’t be the first thing I read. I’ll pick a Terry Pratchett Discworld book, curl up in a blanket, and giggle my way to peace again.

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